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Since its appearance in 1935, the Monopoly board game has become the best-selling board game in the world. Over 200 million monopoly games have been sold and an estimated 500 million people have played it. Sold in 80 countries and 26 languages, Monopoly has been sneaking into homes around globe. But is Monopoly really the wholesome family fun Parker Brother wants you to see it as?

The Monopoly board game sends subliminal messages into the children who play it. The title itself teaches children that Monopolies are something grand, fun, and exciting. Something good. Something to strive for. This lesson is echoed throughout the game as players rely on their monopolies to take mass amounts of money from opponents and claw their way to the top of the economic latter.

Many other subliminal messages are scattered throughout the game. The chance space for instance shows children that it's a good thing to take unneeded risks, which although not very important in a small-scale game world, could be the difference between life and death later. When a player rolls doubles three times or lands on the "Go to Jail" space, they are sent directly to jail, but with a small bribe of 50 bucks, the jail keeper is very willing to let them leave on their next roll.

Monopoly teaches kids that money is all that matters, that is the key to happiness, and that having money makes you a "winner". It teaches that friendships are only worthwhile to allow one to make more money, and causes a player to focus solely on himself or herself. Monopoly teaches players to take advantage of others and turns friends and family against one another,

Monopoly gives children a skewed vision of the value of money, and makes the business world seem overly simple. It leads them to believe that making money in the corporate world is surprisingly easy and that business is all just fun and games. It causes children to become over confident in their abilities, a trait that will surely come back to haunt them.

Monopoly is slowly destroying the youth of our world, and we must put our foot down, say "NO MORE!" and stop Parker Brothers in their tracks. We cannot stand by and watch as our children are brainwashed with subliminal messages and false information. We cannot wait. We must do something now!



Comments

The following comments are for "Monopoly: Destroying the Worlds' Youth For 67 Years"
by mazet

One sided...
While I believe you have some valid points, I think your arguement is very one sided.

I grew up playing Monopoly, and certainly don't fall into any of the categories you mention.

Just to counter...
Monopoly is a medium through which families can interact. I ~know~ from my own dysfunctional lot, that one of the only times we were all doing the same thing, together, was when we played Monopoly.

What about the mathematical worth? Does that not matter? Add, subtract, multiply...All in a session of Monopoly.

What about teaching children, and adults, to be 'careful' with their money, and take responsibility for purchases made, whether good or bad?

At the end of the day, it's a game. I can't really tell by your piece whether you are being serious or not, but, lighten up, eh?

Can I be the boot?
;)

--Jasmine

( Posted by: Jasmine [Member] On: August 21, 2002 )

Yeah, but
It also gives kids a crash course in how to run tech and oil firms.




I'm so funny

( Posted by: lucidish [Member] On: August 21, 2002 )

The game isn't at fault.
Like Jasmine, I think I disagree with what you've said. On the other hand, I don't have a problem with how you've said it - it's fairly well written (if a little one-sided). The only thing I think should be changed would be the last paragraph, which just makes me cringe.

I hope you won't mind if I take my turn to rebutt your argument? :-)

I remember asking how much houses cost in real life when I was playing monopoly with my parents (and I'm sure I asked much more than that!). The game generates questions, not answers in the mind of a child. The real challenge is in getting the child to ask the questions (not usually difficult!) and in guiding them to finding the correct answers once they've asked the question. This is called 'Parenting'.

And one last thing I want to point out in the article: Since landing on the 'Chance' square is not optional, how does it encorage risk taking?

( Posted by: Spudley [Member] On: August 23, 2002 )

Questions
What about the mathematical worth? Does that not matter? Add, subtract, multiply...All in a session of Monopoly.

What about division? It may teach some parts of math, but it also teaches to discriminate!

What about teaching children, and adults, to be 'careful' with their money, and take responsibility for purchases made, whether good or bad?

But Monopoly does just the opposite. The result of a bad decision while playing a game is short lived, teaching the players not to worry as much when there is a choice to be made.

At the end of the day, it's a game. I can't really tell by your piece whether you are being serious or not, but, lighten up, eh?

The "seriousity level" of my article will remain like the sewer rat creeping through the shadows. Unknown.

Can I be the boot?

No, I called it.

I hope you won't mind if I take my turn to rebutt your argument? :-)

Not at all.

And one last thing I want to point out in the article: Since landing on the 'Chance' square is not optional, how does it encorage risk taking?

After hearing the word 'chance' repeated many times, usually with a positive tone, most children will link the happiness that is associated with the chance Monopoly space with the actions they associate with the word 'chance' (gambling, doing life-threatening activities, etc.)

Thank you for your comments and guestions!

-Dan

( Posted by: mazet [Member] On: August 23, 2002 )

if you are so worried
about your childeren being brainwashed with subliminal messages and false information. You should just lock them up in there rooms. there is no were that you can go and not have something along those lines happening to them. The key is to teach them how to see that for themselves to be able to tell what is right and what is wrong
(o my word i sound like a childs shrink)

and if you are just having fun with this i think it is a fun peace and kind of funny

( Posted by: falcon [Member] On: August 26, 2002 )

It's a conspiracy....
Yeah, that's it. *Shakes head* No offense if you were serious. I got a kick out of that.

( Posted by: Brenron [Member] On: August 21, 2003 )





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