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229 years ago, a group of influential colonists made the risky decision of breaking from mother England. Practical circumstances, sound leadership, the grit of the common people, and the help of the French allowed the revolution to stand.
Since then, our nation has been made great by a liberal openness to innovation, a strong sense of industry, a free press, an active democracy, and, perhaps above all, by a spirit of cooperation between peoples of greatly varying cultures, creeds, and even values.
This land has also been blessed by many great thinkers and leaders. In our early years, we had the brilliant Jefferson. In The Civil War, we had the wise Lincoln. Scientists like Einstein, writers like Hemingway, musicians like Jim Morrison, architects like Wright, all benefited from and benefited our nation.
We certainly have a great past. But where are we today?! We have an electorate which is too lazy to educate themselves or intelligently consider the issues. We have an economy devoted to sustaining the lavish dis-order of modern American life. We have an educational system that puts a premium on conformity and technical knowledge and a substantial tax on any kind of free-thinking. We have a crimminal justice system good for little but figuring out how much money the accused has, with a curtsy to their skin color. We have a military that has become a conservative political institution.
Our real leadership is a corporate aristocracy with a fine-tuned machine for brain-washing the public: from TV to Time Magazine to university lecture halls to the cop cars crawling our streets.
In many ways, our very success has been our down-fall. The material wealth generated by our ancestor's resourcefulness, work ethic, and embrace of free thought has become an un-healthy national obsession. We've treated "1 homo sapien, 1 vote" like a golden idol, keeping it on its pedestal long after it served the interests of true democracy: free speech, tolerance for minority view-points, upward mobility for the talented and studious, the preservation of our natural resources, etc.
We are not at a cross-roads: We took a wrong turn back around 2000, when we elected an illiterate war-monger to our presidency over an environmentally aware public servant. However, from our universities to our farms and factories to our churches and mosques, we are still a nation of great potential.
This is a call to all those real Americans, young and old, of all races and all faiths, to those whose blood still cries for freedom. We must rise up and put this great nation back on course toward her destiny... our destiny and the destiny of our children.



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Comments

The following comments are for "The Stasis of the Union"
by seanspacey

Great piece...interesting lines
My favorite line in this piece is the following: "Our real leadership is a corporate aristocracy with a fine-tuned machine for brain-washing the public: from TV to Time Magazine to university lecture halls to the cop cars crawling our streets."

In reality, that is this country's largest threat (though I disagree with the university lecture hall part), but we need more people to realize this. For example, since the late 60's the average household income has stayed virtually the same (small increases have occurred due to women entering the workforce not increases in salaries...and when you factor in the losses in benefits (medical and pensions) total wages have probably decreased) while the wealthiest 1% have seen their income double and the wealthiest .1% have seen their income triple!

Meanwhile certain political parties have cut taxes on these very wealthy families and raised them on those whose income has stagnated. And yet, whenever this subject is brought up what do the corporate mouthpieces scream? Class warfare...and unfortunately too many people buy it.

Pythagoras

( Posted by: Pythagoras [Member] On: June 27, 2005 )

The Stasis
Pythagoras, those are some fascinating numbers; I didn't know them but they generally agree with what I've seen.
I think universities will be a major force for good in the revitalization of America. I just graduated from Southern Oregon University. Although I studied under a lot of innovative scholars, I also saw a politically correct narrow-mindedness sweeping the academic culture. In history departments, the facts have largely become impediments to the appropriate propaganda.
Much thanks for the positive input.

( Posted by: seanspacey [Member] On: June 27, 2005 )

Congratulations Sean!!!!!
On graduating...hope your future goes as you wish.

And on this good essay. I think you did a great job with this essay, I enjoyed reading and learning....

I hope you get lots of reads on this.

"In many ways, our very success has been our down-fall. The material wealth generated by our ancestor's resourcefulness, work ethic, and embrace of free thought has become an un-healthy national obsession"
I agree with this statement.

Good luck!!

Darlene ;)

( Posted by: Dareva [Member] On: June 27, 2005 )

Thanks Dareva
I worked really hard at college and I'm really happy to have graduated. As for the essay, it's just my radical ranting... but I hope I made a good point or two.

( Posted by: seanspacey [Member] On: June 27, 2005 )

re: Sean
Sean,

You make many excellent points, and thanks for clarifying your position on universities. I still take college courses (I attend Drexel and I'm going for a masters in education) but I do it all online, and I haven't noticed any political bias. Though, conservatives have been attacking colleges of late so it doesn't surprise me that they have become more centerist.

Which poses a bigger question...if a party is exceptionally corrupt, should our media be balanced. I mean, during Nixon's term, shouldn't the press have been overtly negative...after all, he was completely corrupt.

And the same goes for Bush, shouldn't our professors and media be pointing out his numerous failings, lies and borderline corrupt acts? I mean, this is a man who told us that Iraq had WMDs, told us he knew where they were, told us that Iraq was connected to al queda, said that iraq had mobile chemical labs, said that we had found the biological weapons, said that their wouldn't be an insurgency, said that our troops would be treated as liberators, said that iraqi oil would pay for the invasion, and on another issue he said that his tax cuts overwhelming favored the middle class. (Bush cut the dividend tax alone from 35% to 15%...which ofcourse favors the wealthy. I got $300...how bout you?)

Pythagoras

ps. much of the second paragraph is from Davidcorn.com...who posed them in a recent article were he ponders why we should believe bush during his latest speech.

( Posted by: Pythagoras [Member] On: June 29, 2005 )





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