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One thing I believe illustrates well how government dehumanizes its citizens is the fact that human beings become statistics when they die in accidents, and remain so.
How so?
Years ago, I had a friend from college whom I hadn't seen in about four years. He died in a gruesome car accident. His twin brother survived with some cuts and bruises, but Mark, the driver, died of severe head trauma.
He had passed through a very obscure stop sign on his way through an infamous intersection (unfamiliar to him). He was then broadsided by a tractor-trailer. He died a few hours later, never regaining consciousness. They harvested his lungs, heart, kidneys and liver. (I hope fervently that many people have stayed alive because of Mark's decision to be an organ donor, especially since the liver can be divided into up to five sections, to refit itself in a young body.)
One may wonder, since the road Mark was travelling crossed over a major highway, why there was no traffic light in place there to make the intersection more apparent to oncoming drivers.
The answer was, as I heard another friend say at Mark's funeral, that Mark had become a statistic: not enough people had died at that intersection to justify placing a traffic light there, in view of the expense.
I had indeed heard of this kind of law before, when listening to people discuss automobile fatalities as a youngster. Now I had finally lost an acquaintance to this morbid requirement.
I had always considered this a stupid law, but now I found this flabbergasting: a young music teacher going into his second year at his position, having already positively affected many young peoples' lives as an educator and band director, was now just a statistic.
Government, particularly in America, does not value people. This is one more reason, if only seemingly a small one amongst many, why I am an anarchist.
Mark has been dead over seven years now (July 27, 1997). I wonder how many more people have been killed at that tricky intersection now, and if the state has met its quota for a proper traffic light?
The only thing I can think of to say is that I hope it was no one as young and promising as Mark.

------
The Alienist
jhfurnish@yahoo.com


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The following comments are for "Throughfare of Doom"
by The Alienist

Stop.
Now as a bright, educated educator you know better that signage is the domain of the local government. It is the reflection on the local community –the same group of people that decide if they need to recycle batteries, engine oil, 2,3,4 or 5 numbers of plastic, city council members, library, etc. The government that you hate, which is American Federal government, is tangentially responsible for interstate highways in a way that if the local and state governments do not comply with the appropriate Federal regulations (CFRs) they don’t get their share of the Fed budget—simple as that!

The realization for you would be to mosey on to that city hall or county building and say your piece, just as you’ve told us at Lit, and in the manner of Rockwell's “Freedom of Speech,” no other country has a painter and the subject like those yet.

See? Things are not so bad.

Regardz,

T!

( Posted by: Teflon [Member] On: October 14, 2004 )





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